Framingham Online News

LEGAL NOTICE: 500 Worcester Rd, Conservation Commission Hearing

Filed under: Legal Notices by News Staff at 5:09 am on April 2, 2011

LEGAL NOTICE

FRAMINGHAM CONSERVATION COMMISSION

The Framingham Conservation Commission will conduct a Public Hearing in the Blumer Community Room at the Memorial Building, 150 Concord Street, on Wednesday, April 6, 2011, at 7:30 pm on a Notice of Intent filed by Adam Connolly for the redevelopment of a portion of the subject parcel and site improvements at 500 Worcester Road.

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LEGAL NOTICE: 11 Brownlea Rd., Conservation Commission Hearing

Filed under: Legal Notices by News Staff at 5:06 am on April 2, 2011

LEGAL NOTICE

FRAMINGHAM CONSERVATION COMMISSION

The Framingham Conservation Commission will conduct a Public Hearing in the Blumer Community Room at the Memorial Building, 150 Concord Street, on Wednesday, April 6, 2011, at 7:15 pm on a Notice of Intent filed by Razik Naoum, for the construction of an addition at 11 Brownlea Road.

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LEGAL NOTICE: 37 Belknap Rd., Conservation Commission Hearing

Filed under: Legal Notices by News Staff at 5:04 am on April 2, 2011

LEGAL NOTICE

FRAMINGHAM CONSERVATION COMMISSION

The Framingham Conservation Commission will conduct a Public Hearing in the Blumer Community Room at the Memorial Building, 150 Concord Street, on Wednesday, April 6, 2011, at 7:00 pm on a Request for Determination of Applicability filed by David Rosenthal for the construction of a fieldstone wall at 37 Belknap Road.

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DCR SPONSORING PUBLIC FORUMS

Filed under: Public Meetings by News Staff at 1:47 pm on January 24, 2010

METROWEST, MA - The Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) is sponsoring five public forums in February to discuss draft recommendations on the future stewardship and management of forest lands within the Massachusetts state parks system.

The upcoming public forums will be at the following dates, times, and locations:

Thursday, February 4, 2010 - 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Westborough Public Library
55 West Main Street, Westborough
(Snow date: Tuesday, February 16)

Saturday, February 6, 2010 -10 a.m.- Noon

North Adams Public Library
74 Church Street, North Adams
(Snow date: Saturday, February 13)

Saturday, February 6, 2010 -2 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Berkshire Community College
Melville Hall Room 201
1350 West Street, Pittsfield
(Snow date: Saturday, February 13)

Tuesday, February 9, 2010 -5 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Jones Library
43 Amity Street, Amherst

Thursday, February 11, 2010 -5 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Taunton Public Library
12 Pleasant Street, Taunton
(Snow date: Thursday, February 18)

DCR began the Forest Futures Visioning Process last spring to determine how best to manage the myriad public benefits and values of forest land within the agency's parks system,

including recreation, tourism, aesthetics, renewable forest products, habitat diversity, and landscape ecology, and how to strike the appropriate balance among them.

The process has several components, including the formation of an advisory group of stakeholders and the Technical Steering Committee. The Technical Steering Committee,which includes academics, practitioners, and scientists, is developing the draft recommendations with input from the public and the stakeholders.

"We are committed to having an open, wide-ranging, public conversation about forests in Massachusetts," said DCR Commissioner Richard K. Sullivan Jr. "We had three public forums and forest tours over the summer, and we look forward to the Technical Steering Committee's recommendations and hearing public comment."

DCR contracted with the Massachusetts Office of Dispute Resolution & Public Collaboration(MODR) at the University of Massachusetts in Boston to develop a design for the public process, act as facilitators throughout its implementation, and ensure that the discussion and processes are unbiased.

The Technical Steering Committee is composed of 11 individuals who have a high level of expertise in the issues, trends, and best practices of forest conservation and ecology, landscape ecology, natural resource economics and law, recreation, silviculture, aesthetics, watersheds, and wildlife habitat.

The draft recommendations will be posted soon on the DCR website, WWW.MASS.GOV/DCR The public is encouraged to review the recommendations and comment on them by email to MODRDCRFFVP@umb.edu. The Technical Steering Committee is expected to make its final recommendations to DCR in late winter 2010.

For more information on this public process, visit: http://www.mass.gov/dcr

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The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), an agency of the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, oversees 450,000 acres of parks and forests, beaches, bike trails, watersheds, dams, and parkways. Led by Commissioner Richard K. Sullivan Jr., the agency's mission is to protect, promote, and enhance our common wealth of natural, cultural, and recreational resources. To learn more about DCR, our facilities, and our programs, please visit www.mass.gov/dcr. Contact us at mass.parks@state.ma.us.


NE Rain Barrel Offer for Framingham Residents

Filed under: General Interest by News Staff at 11:08 pm on July 20, 2006

FRAMINGHAM, MA -- Interested in conserving water? Keep your garden green all summer long with a New England Rain barrel. Special offer: Framingham residents can get the barrel for only $ 62, instead of the regular price of $ 85.

Save money and reduce use of town facilities

To order, call: (877) 977-3135 toll free, or order online at www.nerainbarrel.com.

This is a limited offer. All orders must be received by New England Rain Barrel prior to or on August 17, 2006.

Pickup will be at the DPW Operations Center, 100 Western Avenue
in Framingham on Saturday August 19, 2006 from 9 a.m. until noon.

All area residents are invited to participate in this conservation program!

The program is subsidized by DEP but Framingham doesn’t have a grant to provide the rain barrels. This is a one time event in Framingham for 2006. The DPW and Conservation Commission do no work other than promoting the event and then supplying some support staff on the delivery date, August 19, 2006.

Why a rain barrel? Residential irrigation can account for 400f domestic water consumption in a given municipality. Rain barrels not only store water, they help decrease demand during the sweltering summer months.

Only ¼ inch of rainfall runoff from the average roof will completely fill the typical barrel.

Collection of water from rooftop runoff can provide an ample supply of this free “soft water” containing no chlorine, lime or calcium. Because it tends to have fewer sediments and dissolved salts than municipal water, rain water is ideal for planter beds for a multitude of applications, including biodynamic and organic vegetable gardens, planter beds for botanicals, indoor tropicals like ferns and orchids, automobile washing and cleaning household windows. Saving water in this manner will reduce your demand of treated tap water and save money by lowering your monthly bill.

Rain water diversion also helps decrease the burden on water treatment facilities and municipal drainage systems during storms. The storage of rain water is also recommended for general emergency preparedness, or for areas prone to disasters or drought.

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